Hawaiian Food Traditions: Ted’s Bakery and Portuguese Sausage, Rice, and Eggs

Hawaiian Food Traditions

The fabled (and frequently forgotten) North Shore of Oahu is known for its waves and beaches, not its cuisine. But surfing swells your appetite (or so I’m told) and many locals and visitors feed that hunger with a visit to Ted’s Bakery in Sunset Beach.

North Shore Oahu

Last week, I talked story about Waialua Bakery in Haleiwa serving up home-grown and homemade baked goods, sandwiches, and smoothies.

Ted’s, on the other hand, serves up local traditional food like our family favorite: Portuguese sausage, rice, and eggs. This is such a staple for kama’aina (local residents) that McDonald’s even offers it on their menu.

North Shore OahuTed’s Bakery draws in many visitors for their Chocolate Haupia Pie (haupia is a gelatinous Hawaiian dessert made with coconut milk) but we found much more to love than their version of chocolate cream pie. We stopped in for breakfast on the way to Haleiwa, hoping their Portuguese sausage, rice, and eggs would live up to our high expectations. But not knowing if we’d have time to stop in again, we had to sample their baked goods as well: a malasada (a Portuguese version of a donut), a slice of chocolate haupia pie, and a macadamia nut danish.

I am not a big donut fan but you can ask my kids how many times I marveled at the texture and flavor of their heavenly malasadas. They say Leonard’s in Honolulu has the best malasadas, but I don’t know how they could be better.

Ted's Bakery North Shore Oahu

Ted's Bakery North Shore Oahu

After tempting our taste buds with the pastries, the main course arrived. Luckily, my daughter and I decided to share because clearly Ted expects just that:

Ted's Bakery North Shore Oahu

When we prepare this meal at home, we always use steamed rice but Ted’s offers a fried rice option that @dormantchef chose to sample. It was outstanding – not only is the portion ample but the flavors and texture are expert – still moist but the grains were separated and had soaked up the ingredients nicely.

Portuguese sausage, if you’re not familiar, is similar to linguica but according to Hawaii Magazine: “What’s now called Portuguese sausage here (Hawaii) is a larger, slightly sweeter and softer sausage than the original linguiça. You can buy it in both mild and hot versions, the latter having a dash of red pepper.” We prefer the spicy version but many restaurants only offer the mild. Ted’s, though mild, met our expectations – pan-fried with a crisp bite on the outside and smoky flavor on the inside. Only thing missing was the hot kick. But I guess you can’t have it all, all the time.

At home, we always make our favorite soy sauce eggs to accompany the portuguese sausage, a simple twist on classic scrambled eggs that you should add to your BFD (breakfast for dinner) repertoire.

Portuguese Sausage, Rice, and Soy Sauce Eggs

Active prep: about 10 minutes; Total time: 20 – 25 minutes; serves 4
  • 2 or 3 cups of medium grain japanese rice (or any rice of your choosing)
  • 2 or 3 portuguese sausage links, mild or spicy
  • 8 eggs
  • 3 – 4 tsps reduced-sodium soy sauce
  • 4 tsps of cream or milk
1. Prepare the rice in a rice cooker or stove top. We have a rice cooker and use 3 cups of rice and about 3 1/2 cups of water (or fill to 3 cup line) and it takes about 15 or 20 minutes to complete the cooking cycle.
2. Slice the portuguese sausage on the diagonal.
Portuguese Sausage, Rice, and Eggs
To cook the sausage, I use one of two methods:
Ted's Bakery North Shore Oahu-Broiling is the healthier approach, allowing some of the fat to drain off and is an easy way to cook a large batch fairly easily. Watch closely because it goes from perfect to burnt quickly. I would guess about 5 minutes on the first side and 3 minutes on the second side.
-Pan frying is the other method and what I did for this post. The added benefit was the yummies left in the bottom of the pan, some of which I wiped away but the remainder, along with just a dab of butter was all I needed to scramble up the eggs. It added a nice depth of flavor, even beyond the soy sauce, to the eggs.
3. To prepare the scrambled eggs, crack the 8 eggs into a medium size bowl. Add the soy sauce and milk or cream and whisk briskly. They will have just a tinge of brown in their color. If they are too brown, you’ve probably overdone the amount of soy and they will be too salty. The amount of soy I have suggested is a guideline, adjust to your liking.
4. Heat a medium size fry pan (I usually use non-stick) to medium, add a bit of butter, swirl it around and then add the eggs. Mix quickly until almost dry then divide among your plates or serve from a bowl at the table.
Hawaiian Food Traditions
The plain rice is a welcome counterpart to the slightly salty eggs and rich sausage, as is a large platter of fresh fruit.
Mahalo to @techsavvyteen and @dormantchef for many of the local Hawaiian photos in this post!
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22 Responses to Hawaiian Food Traditions: Ted’s Bakery and Portuguese Sausage, Rice, and Eggs

  1. bibberche April 25, 2012 at 4:35 pm #

    This looks just right for dinner! I am intrigued by soy-sauce eggs – have to try:) And where would you buy Portuguese sausage in the U.S.? I am assuming you managed to bring some from Oahu:)
    I am so grateful for my girls as I can share almost any meal with one of them!
    And now go get some rest! We ain’t young chickens any more (although I am not giving in yet, and it seems, neither are you!)

    • Beth (OMG! Yummy) April 26, 2012 at 8:58 am #

      Hi Lana – good question about where to buy the sausage. I have found variations at costco and recently at whole foods. For authentic made in Hawaii sausage, you can look up where Frank’s Foods from Hilo distributes in your area. For example, in my area there is a Japanese store that carries it. I also got a tip from a friend about a Portuguese butcher nearby that makes it. I am sure in your area you will find a good source!

      I too am blessed with kids that will eat anywhere and anything with me! It’s become part of the fabric of our family. It’s great, isn’t it?

    • Mike November 5, 2012 at 1:06 pm #

      If you can’t find it locally. You can do like I do and order it online from only from hawaii ( onlyfromhawaii.com )

      • Beth November 6, 2012 at 9:17 am #

        Thanks for the suggestion Mike – think I’ll go over and check that site out right now!

  2. sandy corman April 26, 2012 at 4:04 pm #

    Man that chocolate pie looks delicious. So do the rest of the goodies. I am going to have to start cooking again.

    • Beth (OMG! Yummy) April 26, 2012 at 8:46 pm #

      This is so easy – you should try it. It’s a nice twist on scrambled eggs that you just might like!

  3. Carol Sacks April 26, 2012 at 8:11 pm #

    Beth, we are huge breakfast-for-dinner people. Will have to try this soon. Great post!

  4. Nate @ House of Annie April 26, 2012 at 8:29 pm #

    Yum yum! I haven’t had Portuguese sausage, eggs and rice for a long time, ever since we ran out of our supply from the last time we went back to Honolulu.

    Great tip about broiling the sausage. Pan-frying can get messy.

    Leonard’s is indeed the best malasada (IMO) in Hawaii.

    • Beth (OMG! Yummy) April 26, 2012 at 8:50 pm #

      Next trip, we’ll be sure to stop at Leonard’s – we intended to once back in Honolulu but just couldn’t fit it in.

      Frank’s Foods from Hilo has great sausage and I understand some Japanese markets carry it. Hard to go without it for too long, eh?!

      • Nate @ House of Annie April 27, 2012 at 7:37 am #

        Do you mean the Japanese shops in San Jose Japantown, or at Mitsuwa on Saratoga, or at the Marukai in Cupertino?

        • Beth (OMG! Yummy) April 27, 2012 at 8:38 am #

          Nate – I am told by a reliable source that Nijiya Market in Japantown carries the Frank’s Foods brand. I will try to get there next week and report back.

  5. lbddiaries April 27, 2012 at 5:12 pm #

    Wow that looks good! I bet it would also be good with the Cajun sausage I love – andouille, a chewy smoked sausage that I get from http://www.cajungrocer.com. I will google your Portuguese sausage to see if I can find it near Arkansas! I can’t wait to try this.

  6. LBDDiaries (@LBDDiaries) April 27, 2012 at 5:13 pm #

    p.s. do you have a recipe on the pie?

  7. ellescreations April 29, 2012 at 11:04 am #

    Yummy is right!! Makes me want to go to Hawaii, but since that’ s probably not in the cards this year, I’m so glad you found a way to bring a taste of it home. Thanks for sharing!

    P.S. I’m visiting from the Sharefest :)

    • Beth (OMG! Yummy) April 30, 2012 at 11:05 am #

      Thanks for visiting! This is, indeed, an easy way to bring some Aloha spirit to your home when you can’t traverse the ocean to go get some!

  8. Vicki F May 27, 2012 at 5:14 pm #

    Thanks so much for this post! I used to live on Kauai and spent a wild summer on the North Shore as well. Kauai had it’s own island made sausage that was ono. I made some of the best Portuguese soup with it. Really missing Hawaii these days…

    • Beth (OMG! Yummy) May 28, 2012 at 11:59 am #

      Oh I would love your recipe for the soup! Kauai is a wonderful island. Didn’t know there was a sausage maker there tho! Glad this post brought back good memories!

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